Pacific Ocean Cabins With a View

31591d445cd9e5320f9998addf22d76f--boating-rainer-maria-rilke

All photos by S.W. Cosgrove

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At the north western edge of the continental United States, with the Pacific Ocean at your feet, lie a handful of cabins – Iron Springs Resort.  They are arranged on a bluff overlooking a vast horizon that stretches westward to the edges of what is visible, then dissolves into what is not visible to mere mortals.

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As you walk at the edge of the pounding surf, the sandy shores seem to stretch to infinity from north to south.  Keep walking – for hours if you like – and you’ll never reach the end.  The sand, the surf and the springs and estuaries that feed into the ocean recede and dissolve until they exist only in your memory.  As the tides come in and go out at the resort’s Boone Creek, where fresh water meets salt water, you can watch the fresh water rise up over the more dense salt water, while the salt water beneath pushes its way upstream along the bottom.  But as you walk, beware the incoming high tide, or you may find it difficult to return to where you began.

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The sounds of the savage ocean shore are primal, as if from a dream.  The sea birds, screaming at your thoughtless interruption of their dining routine.  The winds, from gentle to so harsh they’ll blister your skin.  And the rhythmic symphony of the great ocean beast itself as it moves ever towards the shore, changing from swells to white capped waves to crashing surf, ending the cycle as a churning but ever thinner sheet of water conforming to the irregular nuance of beach, fragmenting into barely visible ripples that disappear, pulsing and absorbed into the sand, only to reform as rivulets of salt water retreating to the ocean to begin the journey again.

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This is the endless world.  The ocean.  From the beginning of time through eternity.  We have the privilege of being part of the world but for a short time, less consequential than a grain of beach sand that has existed for millions of years.  In comparison, our lives are an almost impercipitible flash of energy, barely noted, lasting an immersurabley short time.

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So you might as well take advantage of it.  Find a place like Iron Springs Resort, with about 25 cabins perched on a bluff stained orange from the iron-filled cliffs, with ruddy cinnamon waters from the nearby Boone Creek staining the beach.  In the 19th century, the area was considered to be a medicinal soaking place.

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The cabins have ocean-facing decks, almost all with stunning sunset panoramas.  The resort has been there for decades, but all the cabins have been extensively renovated, incorporating the original stone fireplaces, with a generous supply of firewood included.  Though the cabins retain their rustic persona, they are equipped to the highest standard for your stay, whether it’s for the night or for the week.  Kitchens are well equipped, with granite countertops and modern appliances, including a dishwasher.   A full complement of cookware and dinnerware is in the cabinets, and there is a nice sharp set of cooking knives – a nice touch.  Fresh linens and towels are included, as well as dog towels to wipe your best friend’s feet.   Iron Springs Resort not only allows dogs, they love dogs.  When I arrived for my first visit, I brought my German Shepherd, Jack, with me the office to check in and they spent more time talking to him than me, letting him pick out a nice tennis ball from the bucket to take to the beach.   Oh yes, dog dishes are also supplied in the cabins.

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The ambience at Rust Springs Resort is serene and congenial.  The cabins are set apart so that privacy is ensured.  Several people I met were repeat visitors, and I later found that many have used Iron Springs Resort as a touchstone for family getaways, reunions, bonfires and clam digs for generations.  There seemed to be a dog or two in every cabin, with everyone respectfully keeping their buddies on the leash.  The exception is the friendly resort dogs, who quite understandably are free to go where they like.

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But once you take the five-minute walk to the beach, off comes the leash, and your dog will enter unrestrained cosmic canine bliss.  Feel free to do so, as well!  My GSD Jack takes off like a shot, with a rooster tail of flying sand behind him, until he gets to the water where he splashes around barking at the waves and chasing gulls.  When he finally slows down, somewhat later, we walk and walk and walk.  By the time we get back to the cabin, he’s ready for chow and a nice laydown, and so am I.  Click here or photo below for video link.

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There is no finer end to the day for me than sitting out on the cabin deck with a glass of wine, watching the sun slip into the ocean.  Every cabin has a barbeque grill on the deck, if you’re in the mood.  If it’s windy or rainy, you just move inside, prop your feet up and enjoy the same view through the expansive glass windows and door.

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In addition to the Pacific Ocean beach on your front doorstep, there are hiking trails in the second growth forest behind the resort, with “wolf trees” that must get their name from the branches that look to me like wolf teeth.  There’s also fishing, shell fishing, bird watching, as well as marine and rainforest parks.  The razor clams are famous.  The Hoh Rain Forest, a world heritage site, is not far away.

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Iron Springs Resort is an easy two and half hour drive from Seattle.  Head west through Olympia towards Aberdeen and then follow the road north to Ocean Shores.  Ocean Shores will be your last chance for grocery and other shopping, and then you keep going north on Washington 109N about another 15 minutes.  After you cross the Copalis River Bridge, keep watch for the large overturned lifeboat on the left, then turn into the parking lot.  Check out of your hectic life and check into ocean time.

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For more information on Iron Springs Resort, including the history of the area and resort, go to their website at http://www.ironspringsresort.com/  There, you will find out one unusual feature of the resort, which is that the beach in front is home to Copalis Beach Airport.  It is the only known beach airport in the contiguous United States and the only stretch of Washington State beach where it is legal to land a plane.  Timing is everything, in case you plan to fly in – the runway and airplane parking area are under water at high tide!  Click here or the photo for the Washington Department of Transportation Copalis Airport link.

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6 thoughts on “Pacific Ocean Cabins With a View

  1. That is really lovelyl. I hae also enjoyed the cabins at Klalaloch Lodge where, at low tide, the beach seems about a half mile deep. I grew up in the Pacific Ocean – almost literally – a bit north of San Diego. What a beautiful dog Jack has grown into – I miss my Gianni SO much! Another great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks, Christina! I grew up in the Midwest, about as far from any ocean one could be, so during my travels, I always gravitated towards the seas and oceans. I’ve taken Rilke’s words to heart and found them true. I’ve been to Kalaloch several times, and do love it, as well. Always stayed in one of the cabins. Winter is my favorite time, as the surf rolls and the wind blows, and all the sissies stay home!

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  3. Thanks Steve, the ocean has power like no other. We are lucky to be close. At times we all have to be put in our place as how important we are in the big picture. The ocean can do that with out a word spoken. Curt

    Liked by 1 person

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