Walking on the Western Edge of North America – the Washington Coast.

It’s autumn, when the Pacific Ocean coastal skies may be sunny or turn dark, ushering in the magnificent storm season.  Either way, it’s a perfect time to explore the westernmost edge of the North American continent.

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So my German Shepherd, Jack, and I headed out from our home on the Puget Sound to spend a week in the historic seaside resort town of Moclips, which was originally a village of the Quinault Indian Nation.  Spaniards were the first Europeans to come ashore here at Santiago beach, adjacent to the Moclips River, which runs to Point Grenville.

Moclips was homesteaded in 1862, and in 1905 it officially became a town when the western most terminus of the Northern Pacific Railway was completed at Moclips and the first Moclips Beach Hotel was completed.  Vacationers came to the beach by the thousands on the Northern Pacific.  No trains run to Moclips these days and most remnants of the the railway’s existence have faded away.  Click the photo below for more Moclips history.

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Today Moclips is a sleepy little seaside town with pristine beaches that stretch to the horizons.  The Moclips River flows from a natural riverine rain forest on a bed of agate rock.  You can see the remains of the train bridge trestles in my photos.

I stayed at the Hi-Tide Ocean Beach Resort, a peaceful and well-maintained collection of very comfortable, fully furnished and tastefully appointed condos with patios facing the ocean, the river and the setting sun. Hi-Tide welcomes dogs!  You can arrange rental on the Hi-Tide Resort website. 

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During our visit, we had a full compliment of weather: sun-drenched shorts and sandals weather at the beginning of the week, with marine air moving in, then darkening skies, wind picking up and rain by the time we left.  It was, in a word, a perfect autumn week on the Pacific Northwest coast.

Here are some of my photos of the journey. If you use them, please attribute.

Hello from Jack!

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5 thoughts on “Walking on the Western Edge of North America – the Washington Coast.

  1. Really lovely, Steve and great photography. I have similarlly enjoyed the individual cabins at Kalalok Lodge, also dog friendly and a beach that might be a half mile deep at low tide. Dog heaven!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Christina. Klaloch is one of the first ocean retreats I ever experienced, and I stayed there a couple times with my last German Shepherd, whom you may remember, Nikki. It really is the classic Pacific Ocean getaway, and they have an excellent restaurant, as well, in the lodge. These days, you have to plan ahead to stay there in the summer, but they have less expensive winter rates and a much better availablilty in the winter. I haven’t been there in perhaps five years, so this is the year. Have you seen my photos from Kalaloch from March? https://swcosgrove.com/2017/03/14/kalaloch-in-winter/

      Like

    1. Both Jack and I come back from even a couple days at the ocean completely refreshed. I consider myself fortunate to have it so close.
      More white stuff on the way this evening, I hear!

      Like

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